July 31 201412·30 am111,209 notes

thesylverlining:

Can I just say how cool it was that both of these superheroines’ personalities and powers were explored in this episode? And how well it was done?

Starfire was not shamed for being emotional. Her powers come from her emotions.

Raven was not shamed for suppressing her emotions. Her power requires amazing control.

They both. Work. They are both different kinds of strength, and they are both heroic and powerful and good. And they each learned from the other, and helped each other out by seeing from each others’ perspective, and finding the value in their differing approaches! Wow!

Fuck yes, this is how you write super-ladies, okay. There’s more than one way to be a “strong female character.” There’s all different kinds of strength. Why don’t more people GET this?

(Source: titans-tower, via nic13)


‘This Should Be The Place' by Silvia Pelissero
July 31 201412·27 am33,583 notes

This Should Be The Place' by Silvia Pelissero

(Source: urhajos, via mattforce7)

lacigreen:

Was talking about #WomenAgainstFeminism today on Twitter, a trend that I see largely as a reaction to (1) extremist feminist politics found readily online and (2) ignorance/stereotypes about feminism.  I tried to handle my frustration with a bit humor but quickly realized this is actually a really emotionally-fraught topic for people.  Maybe not the time for sarcasm.Most the time, feminism in action doesn’t explicitly call itself feminism. I’m talking about things like campaigning for sex ed, same sex marriage, equal pay, maternity leave, reproductive health access, transgender health care, representation, implementing sexual assault/harassment policies, getting women into stem, etc. I think this confused void about what feminists *actually do and believe in* allows the space to be sensationalized by a loud, extreme minority and predatory media sources who see a “hot story”. Mainstream onlookers who don’t know their history or what feminism is (and don’t take a second to learn…) naturally take the bait and then end up railing against something that isn’t even an accurate representation of feminism in the first place. Then feminists are pissed, and anti-feminists are pissed (though misogynists are usually quite happy) and we’ve whipped ourselves up a nice divisive shitstorm of “whose side are you on”?I understand it’s unpopular amongst some feminists to concede that extremism exists; “there’s nothing wrong with radical action” and “they’re a part of the movement too”! I think those are valid points (and I certainly don’t think the solution is to silence/disown anyone), but I also think we have to admit that it can really alienate people from the cause, and perhaps #WomenAgainstFeminism is proof.  What do you think?
July 30 201411·05 pm4,513 notes

lacigreen:

Was talking about #WomenAgainstFeminism today on Twitter, a trend that I see largely as a reaction to (1) extremist feminist politics found readily online and (2) ignorance/stereotypes about feminism.  I tried to handle my frustration with a bit humor but quickly realized this is actually a really emotionally-fraught topic for people.  Maybe not the time for sarcasm.

Most the time, feminism in action doesn’t explicitly call itself feminism. I’m talking about things like campaigning for sex ed, same sex marriage, equal pay, maternity leave, reproductive health a
ccess, transgender health care, representation, implementing sexual assault/harassment policies, getting women into stem, etc. I think this confused void about what feminists *actually do and believe in* allows the space to be sensationalized by a loud, extreme minority and predatory media sources who see a “hot story”. Mainstream onlookers who don’t know their history or what feminism is (and don’t take a second to learn…) naturally take the bait and then end up railing against something that isn’t even an accurate representation of feminism in the first place. Then feminists are pissed, and anti-feminists are pissed (though misogynists are usually quite happy) and we’ve whipped ourselves up a nice divisive shitstorm of “whose side are you on”?

I understand it’s unpopular amongst some feminists to concede that extremism exists; “there’s nothing wrong with radical action” and “they’re a part of the movement too”! I think those are valid points (and I certainly don’t think the solution is to silence/disown anyone), but I also think we have to admit that it can really alienate people from the cause, and perhaps #WomenAgainstFeminism is proof.  What do you think?

When you love someone… truly love them, friend or lover, you lay your heart open to them. You give them a part of yourself that you give to no one else, and you let them inside a part of you that only they can hurt—you literally hand them the razor with a map of where to cut deepest and most painfully on your heart and soul. And when they do strike, it’s crippling—like having your heart carved out. It leaves you naked and exposed, wondering what you did to make them want to hurt you so badly when all you did was love them. What is so wrong with you that no one can keep faith with you? That no one can love you? To have it happen once is bad enough… but to have it repeated? Who in their right mind would not be terrified of that?

ironicdavestrider:

You know if Arizonans actually had proper sex education maybe this wouldn’t have happened.
July 30 201410·46 pm23,005 notes

ironicdavestrider:

You know if Arizonans actually had proper sex education maybe this wouldn’t have happened.

(Source: candice-bear, via befurbelowed)

July 30 201410·45 pm297 notes

martina-naldi:

Pencil & Photoshop.

If I had more time, I’d love to draw more stuff like this.

(Source: martinanaldi.blogspot.it, via fairytalemood)